rasheed – Raspberry PI Projects http://projects-raspberry.com World Biggest Site for Raspberry PI Projects - Tutorials - Ebooks - Project Ideas Sat, 10 Feb 2018 13:34:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Raspberry Pi rival: Android friendly, 4K-capable Asus Tinker Board gets upgrade http://projects-raspberry.com/raspberry-pi-rival-android-friendly-4k-capable-asus-tinker-board-gets-upgrade/ http://projects-raspberry.com/raspberry-pi-rival-android-friendly-4k-capable-asus-tinker-board-gets-upgrade/#respond Tue, 16 Jan 2018 13:07:58 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=13540 Asus has souped up its Raspberry Pi rival, the Asus Tinker Board, adding on-board storage it says will make the board even faster. The new Asus Tinker Board S is broadly similar in spec to the original, but adds 16GB of eMMC storage, which Asus promises will boost performance when reading and writing files over the SD card […]

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Asus has souped up its Raspberry Pi rival, the Asus Tinker Board, adding on-board storage it says will make the board even faster.

The new Asus Tinker Board S is broadly similar in spec to the original, but adds 16GB of eMMC storage, which Asus promises will boost performance when reading and writing files over the SD card storage on the original board.

The Tinker Board is both more powerful and more expensive than the Raspberry Pi 3, using a faster processor and offering more memory but costing $79.99, considerably more than the £33 or $35 Pi 3.

As with the original Tinker Board, the S has a quad-core 1.8GHz Rockchip processor, compared to the quad-core 1.2GHz Broadcom processor in the Raspberry Pi 3. The computer also has 2GB of memory, double that of the Pi 3, and uses the faster DDR3 RAM. The original Tinker Board was benchmarked as being almost twice fast as the Pi 3 in Geekbench, and ASUS claims improved CPU, GPU and memory performance over competitors like the Pi.

SEE: Hardware spotlight: The Raspberry Pi

Alongside the addition of onboard storage, Asus highlights various minor new features in the S: HDMI-CEC support to allow a single remote control to be used with both the Tinker Board S and a TV. For hardware hackers, the S bolsters its 40-pin header with 28 general-purpose input output (GPIO) pins with an an power-on pin and enhanced I2S pin with Slave mode, as well as an improved software API. Other changes are low-voltage input detection to avoid power issues and audio jack plug-in detection.

The Tinker Board also beats the Pi’s on specs by supporting 4k video, Gigabit Ethernet and 192kHz/24-bit audio.

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While the Pi 3’s processor is based on a newer, 64-bit architecture, compared to the 32-bit based architecture in the Tinker Board, the Tinker Board’s ARM Cortex A17-based chipset has been shown to outperform the Pi 3’s ARM Cortex A53-based chipset in certain tests.

Similar to the Pi 3, the Asus board also can handle 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi but adds support for swappable antennas. However while the Pi 3 supports Bluetooth 4.1, the Tinker Board offers Bluetooth 4.0. Like the Pi 3, the Tinker Board also has four USB 2.0 ports.

The Asus Tinker Board S is the latest in a long line of more powerful alternatives to the Raspberry Pi, which is not due an upgrade to the Pi 4 before 2019.

As ever, if you’re looking for a low-cost computer that is easy to get started with, then the Raspberry Pi 3 is probably the best choice, due to the Pi’s extensive range of operating systems, software, projects and community support.

That said the Tinker Board is better than many competitors in terms of the range of operating systems it supports, including Android 6.0, Kodi-based media-center operating systems and the Chromium OS-based Flint OS. It also has its own Debian 9-based Tinker OS, although its initial release was criticized as being far more bare bones in terms of bundled software than the Pi’s official Raspbian OS.

One note of caution, despite many Pi clones now being faster on paper, sometimes the spec sheet doesn’t tell the entire story, due to bottlenecks elsewhere in the system.

Revealed at this year’s CES event in Las Vegas, the Tinker Board will be available in Q1 of this year for $79.99.

Tinker board specs

 

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The best accessories for your Raspberry Pi http://projects-raspberry.com/best-accessories-raspberry-pi/ http://projects-raspberry.com/best-accessories-raspberry-pi/#respond Tue, 16 Jan 2018 12:29:00 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=13529 Vivek Nanda has been a technical editor and content manager for over 20 years at B2B magazines in the electronics industry. He enjoys creating contextual content, crafting content strategy and working with online product development teams. In 2017, The MagPi Magazine – the official Raspberry Pi magazine – announced that over 12.5 million of the […]

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Vivek Nanda has been a technical editor and content manager for over 20 years at B2B magazines in the electronics industry. He enjoys creating contextual content, crafting content strategy and working with online product development teams.

In 2017, The MagPi Magazine – the official Raspberry Pi magazine – announced that over 12.5 million of the Raspberry Pi single-board computers (SBCs) had been sold since the 2012 introduction of the first version. The Pi has not only proven to be a favorite of hobbyists, makers and engineers alike, it has even caught the interest of AI researchers at Microsoft.

Coupled with its explosion in popularity is the list of accessories that complement this SBC. The following is a list of recommended accessories for you, the Raspberry Pi aficionado.

If, however, you aren’t there yet, we can help you get started. So let’s start with a kit.

The starter kit for the new Raspberry Pi owner
We recommend Raspberry Pi Foundation’s own starter kit for a general exploration of the SBC. The kit includes a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B, 8-GB or 16-GB NOOBS SD card, case, a 2.5-A multi-region power supply, 1-m HDMI cable, optical mouse and a keyboard with high-quality scissor-switch action.The best accessories for your Raspberry Pi

What we really like about this kit is that it comes with a copy of “Adventures in Raspberry Pi.” The author, Carrie Anne Philbin, guides you through your new SBC acquisition, demonstrates how to write programs in Scratch and Python, uses developer tools like Minecraft Pi and Sonic Pi and discusses several first projects.Sonic Pi and discusses several first projects

Armed with a Raspberry Pi, it’s time to look at ways you can get the most of your SBC – through accessories and guidance.

Raspberry Pi Cookbook
First up is the book by Simon Monk that goes beyond the guidebook in the starter kit to give you over 200 recipes or projects. It will teach you how to set up and manage the board, connect it to a network, work with its Linux OS, program in Python, control other hardware including motors, acquire information from sensors and a lot more. The Raspberry Pi Cookbook is just $39.99.

If you want to delve deeper into the Python programming language, we also recommend Python for Microcontrollers: Getting Started with MicroPython. This book will not only teach you the Pi’s Python native language but arm you with eight additional example projects.Raspberry pi cookbook

Google AIY Voice Kit for Raspberry Pi
To quickly build a ready-to-go project – in about an hour and a half flat – try AIY Projects’ Google AIY Voice Kit. For only $29.99, you can build yourself your own voice-activated home assistant.

The kit includes a voice Hardware-Attached-on-Top (HAT) accessory board, voice HAT microphone board, 3-in. speaker, arcade-style pushbutton, frame and plastic standoffs. All you’ll need to do is supply a Raspberry Pi 3 board, an SD card, size “00” Phillips screwdriver and some Scotch tape.Google AIY Voice Kit for Raspberry Pi

Joy Bonnet
If you are planning to build a gaming system, then you’ll need a game controller. Adafruit’s Joy Bonnet sits on top of a Pi Zero to enable arcade-like control. For only $15.61, this bargain controlleris a fully assembled HAT, which means you don’t need to solder anything. All you need to do is to install your script on the Pi and upload your emulator, such as the RetroPie or the EmulationStation.

You can also use the Joy Bonnet with Pi A+ or B+/2/3, but it’s the Pi Zero that it fits the best.game controller

Raspberry Pi Sense HAT
Ready to use sensors to build games, control other hardware or conduct science experiments? The Raspberry Pi Sense HAT attaches several on-board sensors on top of the Raspberry Pi via the GPIO pins. It was made for the Astro Pi mission and was launched to the International Space Station in December 2015 to perform science experiments.

This HAT includes a gyro, accelerometer, magnetometer, temperature sensor, barometric pressure sensor and a humidity sensor. An 8 × 8 RGB LED matrix will display data from the sensors, and you can use a five-button joystick to interact with your project here on Earth.

You can buy the Sense HAT for $70.39 and download Raspberry Pi Foundation’s Python library here to control it.Raspberry Pi Sense HAT

Adafruit 7-in. LCD TFT touchscreen
Turn the Pi into a tablet with Adafruit’s 7-in. touchscreen, which gives you a 1,024 x 600 resolution that is a good match for embedded computing needs.

You can power it over USB and input over HDMI. Included is a resistive touchscreen-to-mouse controller (AR1100) – a board that handles A/D conversion – as well as calibration software. A wired PCB with buttons allows you to enter the display’s menu for adjusting brightness, contrast and color.

Get it from Arrow for $80.01.

If you are developing an LED wall display, consider adding an Adafruit RGB Matrix HAT to create a scrolling display using 16 x 32, 32 x 32, and 32 x 64 RGB LED matrices with HUB75 connections.Adafruit 7-in. LCD TFT touchscreen

The Pi-Top Laptop
For those who are thinking of using the Pi as a thin client or more, the Pi-Top will get you an open-source laptop for only $299.99. You’ll get a 14-in. 1080p LCD, complete with an enclosure that includes a keyboard, trackpad and battery, a PCB to manage the connections between the Pi and the rest of the system, 8-GB SD card, cables and charger.

What’s best about this Pi-to-Laptop converter is that assembly is as easy as “clicking” the supplied parts into place.The Pi-Top Laptop

Pimoroni SkyWriter HAT
Our last pick is an accessory that will introduce you to the growing gesture control market. With the SkyWriter HAT, you can bring the power to use gestures to your Raspberry Pi (Models 3, 2, A+, B+ and Zero) for only $18.99.

The HAT has an electrical near-field 3D/gesture sensor that can detect your movements as far as 5 cm away and can work from behind non-conductive material-like fabric. It tracks finger movements and gestures such as tap/double-tap and finger flicks.Pimoroni SkyWriter HAT

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Recommended Video Courses http://projects-raspberry.com/recommended-video-courses/ http://projects-raspberry.com/recommended-video-courses/#respond Mon, 15 Jan 2018 18:35:15 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=13522 List of highly recommended Video Courses for beginners and experts by Projects-Raspberry.com site. Proper enrollment into a raspberry online course will give you the solid base to move forward with raspberry projects.

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List of highly recommended Video Courses for beginners and experts by Projects-Raspberry.com site. Proper enrollment into a raspberry online course will give you the solid base to move forward with raspberry projects.

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Connected Studio Warning Light http://projects-raspberry.com/connected-studio-warning-light/ Tue, 09 Jan 2018 14:38:21 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=7568 In this Instructable, we’re going to build a very modern take on an iconic piece of studio equipment: a smart on-air warning light that responds to the Robin room reservation system. This project started life as a practical solution to our occasional need for quiet in a busy office of creatives while recording Uncorked Studio’s […]

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In this Instructable, we’re going to build a very modern take on an iconic piece of studio equipment: a smart on-air warning light that responds to the Robin room reservation system.

This project started life as a practical solution to our occasional need for quiet in a busy office of creatives while recording Uncorked Studio’s podcast, With Intent. To read the whole back-story, and find out more about Uncorked Studios, take a look at our blog post.

Bits and Pieces

  1. Sandies 343-110 3-sided studio warning light
  2. Raspberry Pi 2B
  3. USB A to micro B cable and USB power supply
  4. 8GB+ SD card
  5. USB keyboard
  6. HDMI cable and monitor
  7. USB Mini WiFi Adapter based on Realtek 8188CU
  8. 12V power supply that can deliver at least 1.25A. We recycled an old laptop power brick that can deliver 12V/5A.
  9. Pimoroni ExplorerHat Pro expander board
  10. 12V G4 26 LED lamp assembly
  11. Murata 78SRH-5/2-C DC-DC converter
  12. 2x 2N2222A/PN2222A NPN Transistors, TO-92 package
  13. 2x 10K resistors (leaded)
  14. Assorted breadboard wire
  15. 4x Delrin screws, nuts and standoffsConnected Studio Warning Light

Initial assembly

  • Plug the ExplorerHat expander board into the RaspberryPi
  • Plug a USB keyboard into any of the USB ports
  • Plug the HDMI cable into the RPi and connect a monitor
  • Insert the USB WiFi dongle into any available USB port

At this point, don’t power the board up. For the first couple steps in this Instructable, we’ll power the RaspberryPi from the USB power supply and cable, connected to J1 (marked “PWR IN”). After the board is booting and configured, we’ll mod it to run off the 12V power brick.

Step 1: Raspbian Installation and Configuration

Raspbian is a Debian Wheezy variant built for the RaspberryPi. For this project, we installed the stock Raspbian build, configured it for command-line only access, and added a few packages to support the additional hardware we installed.

To get the RPi booting a fresh copy of Raspbian, follow the instructions for NOOBS Setup, stopping at “FIRST BOOT” step 5 (raspi-config). Since this application requires the RPi to understand our current time and time zone, we’ll make a few modifications to the standard config before exiting the utility.

Get some more room

From the main menu, select “1 Expand Filesystem” and follow the prompts to make some more space on the SD card.

Locali(s/z)e Raspbian

By default, Raspbian is configured for the UK, including time zone and keyboard layout. If you happen to live elsewhere, a little reconfiguration is required. Clayton Smith wrote a very concise guide to Making the Raspberry Pi a little less British. (His instructions assume you’re starting from the command prompt; to get there, exit out of raspi-config and log in to a shell.)

  1. From the raspi-config main menu, select “4 Internationalisation Options”
  2. Select “I1 Change Locale”
  3. Deselect en_GB.UTF-8 and select the locale appropriate to your location. We chose en_US.UTF-8.
  4. Select OK to return to the main menu
  5. Once again select “4 Internationalisation Options” and then “I2 Change Timezone”. Walk through the screens to select your time zone, and save to return to the main menu.
  6. Once again, select “4 Internationalisation Options” and then “I3 Change Keyboard Layout”. Select the correct keyboard layout for your system. Save, and return to the main menu.
  7. It’s probably a good idea to change the default password on your RPi at this point. Select “2 Change User Password” and follow the prompts.
  8. Save, and then exit raspi-config by selecting “Finish”.

Log in to the RaspberryPi using the password you set in step 7 above. (Default user is ‘pi’, password is ‘raspberry’.)

Update Raspbian and install a few essentials

It’s a good idea to update Raspbian to the latest build, and then install a few essential tools we’ll need later. Given all that may have been installed, a reboot is a good idea.

sudo apt-get update -y && sudo apt-get upgrade -y
sudo apt-get install -y git build-essential vim tmux curl
sudo reboot

Step 2: Set up WiFi

Install the USB WiFi adapter

By default, Raspbian comes with the drivers required to support the USB mini WiFi adapter. The driver should have loaded automatically on boot. To confirm, run the lsusb utility.

pi@localhost ~$ lsusb | grep WLAN 
Bus 001 Device 004: ID 0bda:8176 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. RTL8188CUS 802.11n WLAN Adapter

Configure the WiFi interface for your network

Now, we just need to configure the WiFi interface to access your WiFi network. (Oliver Marriott provides a very complete set of instructions for setting up WiFi on the RPi. The abbreviated version appears below.)

Edit /etc/network/interfaces with your favorite editor, and add the following block at the end, changing the parameters for wpa-ssid and wpa-psk to match your network configuration.

iface wlan0 inet dhcp
	wpa-ssid “YourSSIDHere”     
	wpa-psk “YourPasswordHere”
iface default inet dhcp

Now, bring up the wlan0 adapter to get the changes and request a new DHCP address

pi@localhost ~$ sudo ifup wlan0
pi@raspberrypi ~ $ ip addr
...
3: wlan0:  mtu 1500 qdisc pfifo_fast state UP qlen 1000    
link/ether xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff    
inet 192.168.1.100/24 brd 192.168.255.255 scope global wlan0

Set up the host name (optional)

Depending on your network configuration, this may be an optional step. This will enable your RPi to broadcast its hostname so that you may ssh into it by name rather than IP address. To do this, we’ll install avahi-daemon, and configure it to broadcast as onairlight.local.

sudo apt-get install avahi && sudo apt-get install avahi-daemon

Open /etc/avahi/avahi-daemon.conf, and modify the [server] section to broadcast the correct host name and domain. Modify as required to match your network configuration and requirements.

[server]
	host-name=onairlight
	domain-name=local

Then restart the avahi-daemon service

sudo service avahi-daemon restart

Step 3: Install NTPD

Since we’re going to be consuming a calendar service to control when the light is on, we’ll need to make sure the RPi always has the correct time. Simply install ntpd and you’re good to go.

sudo apt-get install ntpd

Connected Studio Warning Light schematichStep 4: Install the ExplorerHAT python libraries

Pimoroni’s instructions on Github are complete and very good.

TL;DR:

curl get.pimoroni.com/i2c | bash
sudo apt-get install python-smbus
sudo apt-get install python-pip
sudo pip install explorerhat

You can then confirm the card is working.

pi@onairlight ~ $ sudo python
Python 2.7.3 (default, Mar 18 2014, 05:13:23) 
[GCC 4.6.3] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import explorerhat
Explorer HAT Pro detected...
>>> explorerhat.light
blue, green, red, yellow

 

 

 

For more detail: Connected Studio Warning Light

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Raspberry pi free online courses and training http://projects-raspberry.com/raspberry-pi-free-online-courses-training/ Sat, 30 Dec 2017 13:23:13 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=13219 This is the list of free online available video courses,you might be interested in premium paid online video courses recommended by us.                          

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This is the list of free online available video courses,you might be interested in premium paid online video courses recommended by us.

1. Free Course via Udemy by Core

 

 


 

2. Free Course via Udemy by Ben

 

 


 

3. Free Course via Instructables

 

 


4. Free Course via Youtube by Andy

 

 


 

5. Free Course via Youtube by TechErudio

 

 


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Antique Radio into an Airplay Speaker http://projects-raspberry.com/antique-radio-into-an-airplay-speaker/ Fri, 29 Dec 2017 13:29:04 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=7520 My father-in-law is a musician and a lover of mid-century modern design. I have an obsession with tinkering. Somewhere in that mix lies the perfect gift and the perfect challenge. After taking a couple of trips to antique stores and reading a few Intructables, I came to the conclusion that I should turn an old […]

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My father-in-law is a musician and a lover of mid-century modern design. I have an obsession with tinkering. Somewhere in that mix lies the perfect gift and the perfect challenge. After taking a couple of trips to antique stores and reading a few Intructables, I came to the conclusion that I should turn an old mid-century radio into an Airplay speaker with the help of a Raspberry Pi. What better gift could there be for a lover of music and mid-century design?

Before we go further let me say that I am by no means an electrical anything. I know amps kill, capacitors will hold a charge, being shocked hurts, and the wife gets very angry when you trip the breaker. So I’m sure there’s a better more professional way to do this. This is just my whiskey-fueled 1 am design. 🙂Antique Radio into an Airplay Speaker

Materials:

  • Old radio
  • Raspberry Pi B+
  • 8GB SD Card
  • 5v ac adapter
  • Pi Case (optional)
  • 18ga Wire
  • Spare USB Speakers
  • Soldering Iron
  • Low heat solder
  • Wire Cutters
  • Hot Glue
  • Dremel with cutting wheel

Step 1: Tear it apart

This is the fun and easy part: disassembly. When you’re taking any unknown thing apart it’s always helpful to take lots of photos to reference where screws and parts go. It’s also useful to store the bits in sandwich bags labeled by where they go. Or if you can, screw back into where they came from.

This radio was built in 1943 and it has 70 years worth of dust and grime in it. So I popped off the back and clipped the antennae wire. I’m not rebuilding the radio so I won’t need it.

Then I pulled the guts out. The resistors were made of paper and wax….cool. Most of those are going to be removed to make room for the replacement parts. Anything big and bulky was snipped and trashed.

Step 2: Clean up

Even though I’m not using the majority of the original parts I wanted to keep some of them in there. Cause hey…tubes look cool.

A little bit of rubbing alcohol and some wipes later…pretty as the day it was built.

Step 3: The Engineering

Here’s where it starts to get interesting. There were 3 things i wanted to accomplish.

  1. Reuse the original speaker for that authentic sound
  2. One of the knobs had to at least turn the thing on
  3. The interior light had to work

Like I forewarned I’m not an electronics anything…just a guy who knows enough to get in trouble.

The hurdles

  • To reuse the original speaker I needed an amp
  • To power the interior light I needed a 120v power source
  • The Pi only needs 5v
  • I didn’t want 2 power cordsAntique Radio into an Airplay Speaker schematich

Step 4: Power

Okay, to make the volume button at least a little bit useful I decided to at least have it turn on the Raspberry Pi and the original interior light. To the best that I could follow, the light was wired directly to the on/off button. Simple enough.

The Pi however needed to go through an adapter to reduce the voltage down from 120v to 5v. So what to do? Why, crack the adapter open and wire it straight to the on/off switch of course!

I used a small cut-off wheel to cut a small passage for a couple of 18ga wires to run through. I soldered one end to the power input on the ac adapter and the other ends to power switch for the radio. I closed the ac adapter case back up with a bit of hot glue.

The adapter would fit neatly into the bottom of the tube board after removing the large resistors. I then glued the whole adapter into place as well. The excess cable from the adapter fit neatly beside it so I only needed a few inches to make it to the Pi.

Now with a turn of the switch the interior light would come on and the Pi would boot up.

 

 

For more detail: Antique Radio into an Airplay Speaker

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Raspberry pi wifi router prank http://projects-raspberry.com/raspberry-pi-wifi-router-prank/ Tue, 26 Dec 2017 12:45:16 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=7505 Introduction Do your neighbors leech off your wifi? Got a raspberry pi? We’re going to build a wifi router that redirects users to a website of our choice regardless of what URL they request. In our case, we’re going to redirrect users to People of Walmart . This instructable is loosely based on Adafruit’s Raspberry […]

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Introduction

Do your neighbors leech off your wifi?

Got a raspberry pi?

We’re going to build a wifi router that redirects users to a website of our choice regardless of what URL they request. In our case, we’re going to redirrect users to People of Walmart . This instructable is loosely based on Adafruit’s Raspberry Pi wifi router howto and this tutorial on using iptables to prank wifi users.Raspberry pi wifi router prank

Step 1: Materials:

For this instructable you will need:

1. Raspberry pi. I used a Pi 2 model B but any model should be fine.

2. USB WIFI adapter.

3. SD card with Raspbian. If you’ve never installed Raspbian before, this howto will show you how to get started.

4. A wired internet connection.

5. A monitor and keyboard for the pi. When doing networking stuff it’s best to work from the Pi’s console.

Step 2: Boot up and Install Packages

After you boot up your pi and log in to the console, we’re going to install a DHCP server package and an access point package.

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install hostpad
sudo apt-get install isc-dhcp-server<br>

Step 3: Set up the wireless interface

Next we’ll give our wireless interface a static ip address. I used 10.0.50.* as my block of addresses but you can use any non publicly routed subnet you’d like.

Open up the interfaces file

sudo nano /etc/network/interfaces<br>

At the bottom of the file add this:

iface wlan0 inet static
	address 10.0.50.1
	netmask 255.255.255.0

Now save the file and exit. After you’ve exited reboot the pi by pressing alt-ctrl-delete

Step 4: Set up dhcp

Now we’ll set up the DHCP server to assign IP addresses when users connect to the pi.

We’re going to back up the existing dhcpd.conf file and create our own.

sudo mv /etc/dhcp/dhcp.conf /etc/dhcp/dhcp.conf.old
sudo nano /etc/dhcp/dhcpd.conf

Type the following into the file

authoritative;

subnet 10.0.50.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
	range 10.0.50.10 10.0.50.100;
	option broadcast-address 10.0.50.255;
	option routers 10.0.50.1;
	default-lease-time 600;
	max-lease-time 7200;
	option domain-name "local";
	option domain-name-servers 8.8.8.8, 8.8.4.4;
}

Next we’ll tell the dhcp server to listen on our wireless interface by opening this file:

sudo nano /etc/default/isc-dhcp-server

Find this line:

INTERFACES=""

and change it to

INTERFACES="wlan0"

Save then close the file.

Raspberry pi wifi router prank schematich

Step 5: Set up hostapd

Hostapd let’s your Pi act as a wifi access point. We’ll configure it by creating a new configuration file.

sudo nano /etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf

Enter this into the configuration file. Substitute “MyPrankWIFI” with whatever you want to name your access point

interface=wlan0
driver=rtl1871xdrv
ssid=MyPrankWIFI
hw_mode=g
macaddr_acl=0
auth_algs=1
ignore_broadcast_ssid=0

Open up the defaults file for hostapd

sudo nano /etc/default/hostapd

Find this line

#DAEMON_CONF=""

and change it to

DAEMON_CONF="/etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf"

When you’re done editing, save and exit.

 

 

For more detail: Raspberry pi wifi router prank

Current Project / Post can also be found using:

  • raspberry as access point

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How To Hack An Apple Time Capsule With A Raspberry Pi http://projects-raspberry.com/how-to-hack-an-apple-time-capsule-with-a-raspberry-pi/ Wed, 06 Dec 2017 13:24:04 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=7407 Introducing the “Pi Capsule.”  It’s currently the only Apple Time Capsule you can plug into your TV…,does this make it an Apple TV?  😉 Ok, ok, let’s say you have an old Apple Time Capsule laying around that doesn’t work anymore… (there’s quite a few of these out there now as the first generation Apple […]

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Introducing the “Pi Capsule.”  It’s currently the only Apple Time Capsule you can plug into your TV…,does this make it an Apple TV?  😉

Ok, ok, let’s say you have an old Apple Time Capsule laying around that doesn’t work anymore… (there’s quite a few of these out there now as the first generation Apple Time Capsules have been dying now for some time due to failed hard drives or power supplies.)

Maybe you want more out of your dead Apple carcass.  After all, after spending $500+ dollars on your luxury Apple backup device why not squeeze some more use out if it.

This hack will show you how to repurpose (recycle) an Apple Time Capsule with a ($35) Raspberry Pi computer motherboard.

Take note, this hack will also work even if you do not have a Time Capsule.  Simply replace the Time Capsule with a suitable replacement worthy of housing your Raspberry Pi.  This Instructable provides you all the basics for recycling something to build a Raspberry Pi case and automatically backup your Mac with Time Machine.How To Hack An Apple Time Capsule With A Raspberry Pi

Table of Contents

1.  Introduction – How To Hack An Apple Time Capsule With A Raspberry Pi

2.  Why Hack the Time Capsule?

3.  What Is An Apple Time Capsule?

4.  Disassembling The Apple Time Capsule

5.  What is a Raspberry Pi?

6.  Build A New Power Circuit For The Pi Capsule & Do Some Testing

7.  Laser Cut Some Acrylic To Retrofit The Apple Time Capsule Case & Build A Pi Capsule

8.  Change out the Green LED on the Time Capsule for a Blue LED

9.  Install Raspbian onto an SD Card and Boot the Raspberry Pi

10.  Connect your Hard Drive or SSD to the Raspberry Pi

11.  Configure A Hard Drive To Serve As Time Capsule

12.  The Finished Product – “Pi Capsule”

13.  How well did it work?

Step 1: Introduction – How To Hack An Apple Time Capsule With A Raspberry Pi

Once outfitted with the Raspberry Pi, your “Time Capsule”  (will be a “Pi Capsule”) and will allow you to keep backing up your computer using Apple’s software called Time Machine.

In addition, you can run Pandora, watch movies, setup a surveillance system you can view on your iPhone or Android phone, and more!  There are many instructables that will show you what you can do with your Raspberry Pi, this Instructable will focus only on setting the Time Capsule up to be a reliable case for our Raspberry Pi.

The requirements or wish list that I had for this project are as follows:

1.  Make a cool Raspberry Pi case and disguise my Apple Time Capsule.

2.  Allow the use of 120v AC or 12v DC (through a toggle switch.) Having 12v DC capability allows me to easily make this a portable device.

3.  Change the Green LED on the front of the Time Capsule to Blue.

4.  Allow for future upgrades (e.g. an Arduino Pro Mini to do some automation, check the temperature, or do some fancy LED work.)

5.  A nifty platform for practicing Python.   😉

This is a “Green Design”  and is eco-friendly, it uses more than 75% recycled parts (and by making it capable to run on 12v DC only we can easily make it solar powered without an inverter.)

Step 2: Why Hack the Time Capsule?

Well, here is my hack to guide you through breaking it open and giving it lots of more useful life.  In this Instructable, I show you how to repurpose the Apple Time Capsule with recycled components. ( If you really wanted a nice Raspberry Pi Case you could buy one from me for $10 or make one on your own using the Epilog Laser Cutter at Techshop  (http://www.techshop.ws), then you can also say “I made it at TechShop.”  But this is a proof of concept on how we can make useful things out of something some people might consider garbage or recyclable material.

This hack also actually ended up being very useful, practical, and purposeful.  I decided to call this one finished when I met the following criteria:

1.  Do something more than just be an “Apple Time Capsule”

2.  Made it better (with Time Machine, Airplay, Media Center…)

3.  Made it behave like an XBMC Media Center.

4.  Provided a safe Raspberry Pi enclosure for AC (household electrical) or DC (mobile) operation.

5.  Created a “Green Design” by using recycled materials (the case, the power supply, the hard drive, and components are all from recycled components found at the TechShop.)

I could have done a lot more with this project, but I have custom cases to make and this project allowed me to gain some experience in the design, prototyping, manufacturing, and assembly of a consumer electronics device for home or mobile use.

I had to just be happy with what I learned and move on to the next phase of my product development.

During this process I learned the folllowing:

–  Applied DC electronics theory and practiced prototyping small form factor electronics for consumer use

–  Applied Linux knowledge to install and configure the Raspberry Pi and Debian Linux based Raspbian operating system

–  Learned to make prototypes with little or no money (by recycling)

– Found out what kind of product I could package into a small space, looks good, and will last through vigorous movement (consumers like to move their tech gear around without much care for what’s inside…)

NOTE:  The photo in this step is what the insides of a normal Time Capsule look like.

Step 3: What Is An Apple Time Capsule?

I’m always happily surprised when people at the TechShop see my hacked Time Capsule and they say “Oh Wow Cool!”  But then I ask them if they really know what a Time Capsule is and quite frankly many do not actually know what it does.  They’ve heard of it and pretend to know what it does, but in most cases in my experience they did not know.

So, let me explain. Apple’s combination of hardware (Time Capsule) and software (Time Machine) allows you to back up everything on your Mac, all day everyday.   That’s the simple explanation.

It’s Apple’s solution to Automatic backups, and let me tell you there is nothing like it in the Windows world.

This is Apple’s official link:  http://www.apple.com/timecapsule/

So, I’ll leave the explanation at that, if you have more questions please comment.

Also, many have mentioned the Time Capsule is slow, this is true especially if you are backing up over wireless.  I generally use my Pi Capsule over wired Ethernet (the frist time) and I used an SSD for the hard drive so performance can be improved with these methods.

Keep in mind that the first time you backup a Mac with Time Machine it will take the longest, don’t interrupt the first backup (or it may never finish!)  And, try to do the first backup over wired (versus wireless.)

Also, on an Enterprise Note, recently with some of the OSX 10.8.x updates Apple has claimed to have added the capability to monitor Time Machine backups from an Apple OSX Server (the Server even sends me e-mails… as in the picture in this step), well… it still doesn’t report properly (so I write scripts and use Rsync for Enterprise backups…) but let’s not get off topic.

Step 4: Disassembling The Apple Time Capsule

The first thing to do is take apart the Apple Time Capsule. We are going to need the following tools:

1.  A heat gun
2.  Small Phillips “00” screwdriver
3.  Pliers (in case you have to pull at the bottom rubber piece)
4.  Dremel tool
I actually followed a step by step guide to disassemble the Time Capsule at ifixit.com the link is here:  http://www.ifixit.com/Guide/Disassembling+Apple+Time+Capsule+Lower+Case/3216/1
(Note:  I will be adding a nice HD video on how I took it apart to this Instructable soon.)
Once the Time Capsule was taken apart I used the Dremel tool to cut some holes on the case of the Time Capsule.

Step 5: What is a Raspberry Pi?

The Raspberry Pi is a ($35) electronic main board that can function as a full Linux computer that connects to any modern TV or display through HDMI, or even older style TVs with only RCA (composite connectors.)  The Raspberry Pi also has a “GPU” that allows you to playback HD video.

The Pi was invented in the U.K. as a platform for kids to learn programming.  It was released in the U.S. in February 2013.

If you ask me what a Raspberry Pi is, I would respond with “quite simply an amazing little device that is the essence of how far we have come with technology in this day and age (2013.”)

Step 6: Build A New Power Circuit For The Pi Capsule & Do Some Testing

Once I gutted out all the insides of the Time Capsule I needed a new way to power the Raspberry Pi.

In this step you will need the following tools:

1.  Wire Strippers
2.  Soldering Iron
3.  Solder
4.  Heat Shrink
5.  Heat gun
6.  Vise
7.  Small Hammer
8.  Channel grip pliers

Next thing to do was install a proper power supply for the Raspberry “Pi Capsule.” (The Raspberry Pi by itself with networking requires at least 5v DC with a minimum of 700mA of current capability from your power supply.)  I was fortunate to find a very nice 5 volt power supply with a 2 Amp current capability in our “Bin Wall” at the TechShop in San Jose, so my new power supply had plenty of power to spare for some LEDs and maybe an Arduino.

By the way, the Time Capsule I used for this project was my customer’s and had a failed power supply…My customer wanted the backed up files even thought the Time Capsule had failed.

I recovered the data from the Time Capsule after I opened it and removed the hard drive.  I connected this drive up to my Mac with a “USB to SATA Adapter cable.”  Then I copied the backed up files using the OSX Finder.

TIP:  You don’t need to be a TechShop member to find power supplies like this, as a Maker, you can make it a habit to save old power supplies from old electronics.  Ask people to give you their old electronics and salvage the power supplies for projects like this. In the picture labeled 4381 in this step you can see an example of a plug in (“Wall Wart” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AC_adapter) that is 5v 700mA.  It’s not as big as the one I chose but this would be the minimum if you wanted to just power up the Raspberry Pi, plug in the Ethernet cable, and a USB mouse.

I disassembled the new found power supply and cut the power cable too size after I had the Time Capsule carcass disassembled.
Remember if you want to connect 5VDC power directly to your Raspberry Pi use the built in test leads “T1” (Positive 5v) & “T2” (Negative/Ground) respectively.
Since I wanted to test my Pi Capsule with an HDMI display I retrofitted the Time Capsule case with some holes to expose the HDMI connector on the Raspberry Pi.
Keep in mind that with this hack, you will want to connect the SSD Hard Drive using a SATA to Mini-USB cable and then use an external “Powered” USB Hub.  The SSD should be connected to the Hub and the Hub should be connected to the Raspberry Pi.  I try and make it a habit to only connect a powered USB hub and Wireless mouse directly to the Raspberry Pi.  Everything else like the Wireless card, SSD, Keyboard should go through the powered USB hub.How To Hack An Apple Time Capsule With A Raspberry Pi schematich

Step 7: Laser Cut Some Acrylic To Retrofit The Apple Time Capsule Case & Build A Pi Capsule

I took some measurements and created a file in Corel Draw to allow me to cut some clean looking pieces of clear acrylic to attach to the Time Capsule retrofit.  The pieces are to dress up the holes i cut out, and to make a base plate for the Raspberry Pi and secure it.
I used the Epilog Laser Cutter at TechShop San Jose to cut the acrylic.  I made sure to use a “hairline” to allow the Epilog laser cutter to know I wanted to cut (versus etch.)
The Epilog Laser Cutter is a great way to clean up a retrofit project, but it takes longer this way.  In the long run I am able to make much nicer cases from scratch with this wonderful laser cutter (as in the photo attached to this step with my custom laser cut Raspberry Pi case.)   The thing that I love the most about the Epilog laser cutter is that it allows me to prototype very quickly.
Once I cut the acrylic, I used a # 4-40 Tap Set to make threads to attach the acrylic to the base of the Raspberry Pi holder.  I used #4-40 screws since the acrylic I used was 1/8″.  In addition, the #4-40 screws fit in the mounting holes for the Raspberry Pi.

 

 

For more detail: How To Hack An Apple Time Capsule With A Raspberry Pi

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Getting Temp, Humidity Information with Android Things http://projects-raspberry.com/getting-temp-humidity-information-android-things/ Mon, 22 May 2017 10:46:14 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=10804 Basically, the project will transfer data with DHT11 over wireless through NodeMCU. This transfer will be done by using an AndroidThings as a gateway and light a led by a rule we set. NodeMCU will be Wi-Fi Access Point; start transmitting your IP and port number to network. Save device to system on AP mode, […]

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Basically, the project will transfer data with DHT11 over wireless through NodeMCU. This transfer will be done by using an AndroidThings as a gateway and light a led by a rule we set.

getting-temp-humidity-information-with-android-things

  • NodeMCU will be Wi-Fi Access Point; start transmitting your IP and port number to network.
  • Save device to system on AP mode, and establish wireless connection.
  • Once the client connection is set; read the frequency of temperature and humidity transmission, and start transmitting the data to client in this frequency.
  • Re-connect to network if connection is lost, end client connection and wait for the re-connection.
  • Execute when LED event happened.
  • Set rule and connect IFTTT connection, use your data for channels.

getting-temp-humidity-information-with-android-things1

1 Devzone Register and Application Download

· Register and login free developer account at https://devzone.iot-ignite.com/dpanel/login.php?page=development ,

· Download AndroidThings agent,

2 Getting Ready for Android as IoT Gateway

· Download AndroidThings from this link,

· Download and setup win32 disk imager application,

· Flash the SD Card with Android Things Image, you will need the following this link,

3 AndroidThings Configuration – ADB Connect, IoT Agent Installation

· Boot gateway with Android Things and connect Ethernet,

· Run PowerShell and connect Android Things with ADB console,

· Download and install Android Things agent with ADB console command,

4 AndroidThings Configuration – Wi-Fi (DROM) Connect, IoT Agent Installation

DROM is a recently developed ARDIC Technology that enables the device’s mac ID to be matched remotely on the cloud. DROM establishes connection with the tenant and completes the registration process automatically.

· Enter https://enterprise.iot-ignite.com with your devzone credentials,

· Follow; Administration > DROM > DROM Configuration > Add DROM Configuration step,

· Type a new DROM configuration name and click save button,

· Follow; Administration > DROM > DROM Gateway Configuration > Add DROM Configuration step, type Raspberry MAC ID (Example FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF@ignite.com) , click add button,

· Click the push button and registration will done.

Read More:  Getting Temp, Humidity Information with Android Things

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Website is Down Detector http://projects-raspberry.com/website-is-down-detector/ Mon, 26 Dec 2016 13:31:09 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=8949   If you work in a company that has a website, you know how important it is that the website always be up and running. That’s why you constantly see “99.99999% reliability!” all over the fancy server hosting sites. A website can’t make money if the system is down, so knowing when that happens and […]

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system down detecter

 

If you work in a company that has a website, you know how important it is that the website always be up and running. That’s why you constantly see “99.99999% reliability!” all over the fancy server hosting sites. A website can’t make money if the system is down, so knowing when that happens and reacting quickly is super important. In this Instructable, we will use the LinkIT ONE board to make an alert system that will play a loud alert siren and send us a text message. This way no matter where we are, we can respond as fast as possible!
Step 1: Supplies
Picture of Supplies

Since we’re harnessing a lot of the built-in power of the LinkIT ONE, we don’t need that many external supplies here. You can focus your gathering energy on a quality speaker to play our alarm through!

LinkIT ONE
Speaker (headphones for testing is cool)
SIM Card (Pre-paid for deployment, borrow a friend’s for testing)
An Alarm MP3 File
A Website to check on!

Step 2: Configure your LinkIt ONE Board
Picture of Configure your LinkIt ONE Board

We’ll need to modify some of the switches on the LinkIt One board in order to make it work. Along with the image attached, make sure that you have done the following

1. Set the MS — UART switch to UART (You’ll switch it to MS in a later step temporarily, but not for deployment)

2. Set the USB — BAT switch to USB

3. Set the SPI — SD switch to SPI
Step 3: Connect your GSM and WiFi Antenna
Picture of Connect your GSM and WiFi Antenna

Now, you’ll need to make sure and connect both your WiFi and GSM antenna’s to your LinkIT ONE board. Both of these Antenna’s should have come with your LinkIT ONE kit. Attaching them is pretty self-explainatory: Connect the WiFi Antenna do the socket labeled ‘WiFi’ and your GSM Antenna (Which allows you to send text messages) to the socket labeled ‘GSM’
Step 4: Insert Your Sim Card
Picture of Insert Your Sim Card

I know that most people probably don’t have a pre-paid SIM card laying around. If you are just prototyping and want to see a proof of concept, feel free to remove it from your current cell phone (or one of your friends) just to try it out. If you get serious and want to make this a full-time gig, you will have to pony up for a pre-paid SIM.

Inserting the SIM card is a fairly straight forward process. Flip over your LinkIt One and look at the smaller big metal piece. You can see in the figure where I inserted my SIM card if you are confused.

After you have inserted the SIM card, be sure to attach your GSM antenna that came with your LinkIt One kit. This will allow you to get a cell signal.
Step 5: Download your Alert Sound
Picture of Download your Alert Sound

You could opt for a rather basic siren alarm, such as this or that. But I chose for something a little more fun 🙂

Once you’ve found your sound, download it. If you found it as a youtube link, go ahead and use a youtube downloader website in order to convert it to an mp3 file. Store in a place you’ll remember because we’ll be moving it over to the LinkIT ONE very shortly.
Step 6: Install Music On Device
Picture of Install Music On Device

Now, you’ll want to install your scary voice file on your device. Because we are using the SPI/SD slot for SPI purposes (Sending a text message) we are not able to use the SD to store our mp3 file. Instead we will have to store it in flash memory.
Drag and Drop Music into the LinkIt One Flash Storage

Turn your LinkIt One device into ‘MS’ mode (Mass Storage) and your computer will recognize it just like a usb stick. From here, you can easily drag and drop mp3 files over. The problem is that your limited by the 10mb on the LinkIt One, this means only a handful of songs (if they are short!).

Once you’re done, turn your device back to UART mode in order to deploy code to the device!
Step 7: The Code I – WiFi and Checking if the System is Down

If you look over this WiFi client code, you’ll see basic code that goes and checks if a we can get data from a website or not. In the case provided, we’ve used “www.google.com”.

If we can’t receive data from that website (AKA, the System is Down) then we write to the serial monitor.

 

For More Details: Website is Down Detector

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