Scalable clusters make HPC R&D easy as Raspberry Pi


It brings a powerful high-performance-computing testbed to system-software developers, researchers and others who lack machine time on the world’s fastest supercomputers.

 BitScope Cluster Modules system

The BitScope Pi Cluster Modules system creates an affordable, scalable, highly parallel testbed for high-performance-computing system-software developers. The system comprises five rack-mounted BitScope Pi Cluster Modules consisting of 3,000 cores using Raspberry Pi ARM processor boards, fully integrated with network switching infrastructure.CREDIT: Bitscope

System with thousands of nodes brings affordable testbed to supercomputing system-software developers

LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Nov. 13, 2017—A quest to help the systems software community work on very large supercomputers without having to actually test on them has spawned an affordable, scalable system using thousands of inexpensive Raspberry Pi nodes. It brings a powerful high-performance-computing testbed to system-software developers, researchers, and others who lack machine time on the world’s fastest supercomputers.

“It’s not like you can keep a petascale machine around for R&D work in scalable systems software,” said Gary Grider, leader of the High Performance Computing Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory, home of the Trinity supercomputer. “The Raspberry Pi modules let developers figure out how to write this software and get it to work reliably without having a dedicated testbed of the same size, which would cost a quarter billion dollars and use 25 megawatts of electricity.”

Grider conceived the new solution to provide the systems software community with an inexpensive testbed of similar scale to the largest supercomputers being deployed. Designed and built by BitScope and distributed by SICORP, the Pi Cluster Modules enable developers to build, scale and test software before launching it on Trinity, Crossroads, and other large systems. The modules have other potential applications from education to the internet of things.

The BitScope system consists of five rack-mounted Pi Cluster Modules, each with 150 four-core nodes of Raspberry Pi ARM processor boards. They are fully integrated with network switching infrastructure. With a total of 750 CPUs or 3,000 cores working together, the system gives developers exclusive time on an inexpensive but highly parallelized platform for test and validation of scalable systems software technologies.

“Having worked with Raspberry Pi for quite some time, I’ve long thought it the ideal candidate to build low-cost cloud and cluster computing solutions for research and education,” said Bruce Tulloch, CEO of BitScope. “When SICORP approached us with Gary’s plans, we jumped at the opportunity to prove the concept.”

The Raspberry Pi is an inexpensive, credit-card sized computer that can be connected to a keyboard and TV to do just about anything a typical desktop computer can do. It was developed by the Raspberry Pi Foundation in the United Kingdom to help spread computing in education and in developing countries. The price for a basic model starts at about $25 and consumes only a handful of watts of power.

Beyond HPC system-software development, additional applications for the Pi Cluster Modules include better simulation of large-scale sensor networks, with flexible I/O to connect the actual sensor devices; HPC network topology research, to improve production performance; and the internet of things.

Looking around for a solution to the challenges facing HPC systems software developers, Grider said, he “suddenly realized the Raspberry Pi was an inexpensive computer using 2 to 3 watts that you could use to build a several-thousand-node system large enough to provide a low-cost, low-power testbed to enable this R&D.” Yet he could not find a suitable densely packaged Raspberry Pi system on the market.

“It was just people building clusters with Tinker Toys and Legos,” said Grider, a widely respected innovator in the HPC world. So he turned to SICORP of Albuquerque, N.M., to collaborate on a solution. Then they jointly worked with BitScope of Australia to develop easily scaled rack-mounted units.

About the Raspberry Pi Foundation

The Raspberry Pi Foundation is a UK-based charity that works to put the power of digital making into the hands of people all over the world. The Foundation provides low-cost, high-performance computers that people use to learn, solve problems and have fun. The Foundation also provides outreach and education to help more people access computing and digital making. The Foundation develops free resources to help people learn about computing and how to make things with computers and to train educators who can guide other people to learn.

About SICORP

Based in Albuquerque, SICORP is a leading IT systems integrator and IT services provider, with 20 years’ experience serving government scientific research laboratories, civilian agencies and commercial customers. SICORP has particularly strong experience in high performance computing (HPC), high performance parallel file systems and high performance networking.

About BitScope

BitScope Designs builds embedded test, measurement and data acquisition solutions for education, research and industry. Developed in Australia with local and Chinese manufacture, BitScopes have been sold worldwide since the company was founded in 1998.

About Los Alamos National Laboratory

Los Alamos National Laboratory, a multidisciplinary research institution engaged in strategic science on behalf of national security, is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC, a team composed of Bechtel National, the University of California, BWXT Government Group, and URS, an AECOM company, for the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration.

Los Alamos enhances national security by ensuring the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile, developing technologies to reduce threats from weapons of mass destruction, and solving problems related to energy, environment, infrastructure, health, and global security concerns.

for more detail: lanl.gov




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