Raspberry PI Projects http://projects-raspberry.com World Biggest Site for Raspberry PI Projects - Tutorials - Ebooks - Project Ideas Sat, 10 Feb 2018 13:34:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 8 superb — and cheap — Raspberry Pi alternatives http://projects-raspberry.com/8-superb-cheap-raspberry-pi-alternatives/ http://projects-raspberry.com/8-superb-cheap-raspberry-pi-alternatives/#respond Mon, 29 Jan 2018 04:31:38 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=13559 As great as the Raspberry Pi is — and let’s be honest, all of the devices in that family are excellent, especially for the money — it’s not the only such device available to buy, and some of the rival systems are arguably better as they come with Wi-Fi built-in, and other tricks, such as […]

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As great as the Raspberry Pi is — and let’s be honest, all of the devices in that family are excellent, especially for the money — it’s not the only such device available to buy, and some of the rival systems are arguably better as they come with Wi-Fi built-in, and other tricks, such as the ability to double as a wireless router, run Android, or display on-board scrolling messages.

While there are plenty of pricier (and therefore more powerful) options available, I’ve focused on the more affordable choices here — ones that match, or better, the Raspberry Pi for value and will do everything you’d expect from them, and more.

My final choice is, admittedly, more expensive at $70, but occasionally you might require something with a little more oomph, so I’ve included it here anyway.

Like the Raspberry Pi systems, you will probably need to spend a little extra on the required cables etc., if you don’t have them to hand, so do bear that in mind when buying. You can also pick up cases for some of the devices too.

If you own any of the products I’ve covered below, please let me know what you think of them in the comments. I’d be particularly interested to know whether you’d recommend them or not.

VoCore2

8 superb -- and cheap -- Raspberry Pi alternatives

I wrote about this coin-sized Linux computer/fully functional wireless router last week. It’s a cube-shaped device that comes packed with ports, including Ethernet, USB 2.0, microSD slot, and audio jack. You can read more about it here.

The full VoCore2 costs just $11.99, but there’s a Lite version priced at just $3.99.

You can get one by pledging on Indiegogo now. Shipping is due to begin next month.

Omega2

Omega2

This is a $5 Raspberry Pi rival from the Onion Corporation that comes with integrated Wi-Fi (802.11 b/g/n) and on-board flash storage. It runs a custom Linux distro based on OpenWrt and can also run FreeBSD. There is a selection of apps available to download for it from the Onion App Store.

It’s modular, so you can easily expand its capabilities — add Bluetooth, or GPS for example.

Omega2 was successfully crowdfunded on both Indiegogo and Kickstarter. Shipping is expected to begin next month. Read more about it here.

Orange Pi PC2

Orange Pi PC2

Orange Pi is a powerful 64-bit Raspberry Pi rival — well, clone would be a more accurate description — with Ethernet, three USB ports, USB OTG, 1GB of RAM and a quad-core 64-bit Cortex-A53 processor, and a standalone graphics chip.

It can run Android 4.4, Ubuntu, Debian, Raspbian, and Banana Pi.

It’s priced at $19.98 and available to buy now.

The same company makes a variety of other Orange Pis, including an Orange Pi Zero (pictured below) for $7 which has built-in Wi-Fi and Ethernet.

Raspbian, and Banana Pi

Find out more, and buy an Orange Pi here.

NanoPi 2 Fire

NanoPi 2 Fire

The NanoPi 2 Fire costs $22.99 and for that you get a device powered by an A9 quad-core SoC, with 1GB of DDR3 RAM, Ethernet (no Wi-Fi or Bluetooth though), and USB 2.0. A power management unit supports software power-off, sleep, and wake up functions.

It can run both Debian Linux and Android 5.1.

Find out more, or buy one from here.

BBC micro:bit

BBC micro bit

The BBC’s tiny programmable computer is — like the Raspberry Pi — primarily aimed at schools, and indeed up to a million were given away free to school children in the UK. It has since started rolling out globally and is now handled by the non-profit Micro Bit Educational Foundation.

The device is powered by a 32-bit ARM Cortex processor and comes with a built-in 5×5 LED matrix that gives you 25 individually programmable red LEDs to use as a display, some push buttons, so you can interact with games and programs, and an Accelerometer, Magnetometer and Bluetooth antenna.

It costs £12.99 in the UK (which equates to $16). For two quid extra ($2.50) you can get a BBC micro:bit Go starter kit which includes the device, Micro USB cable, battery pack and four project ideas to get you started.

Find out more about the micro:bit here.

ODROID-C2

ODROID-C2

At $40, the ODROID-C2 is fractionally more expensive than the Raspberry Pi 3, but it’s a 64-bit quad core single board computer powered by a Coretex-A53 (ARMv8) processor with 2GB of DDR3 RAM, and Gigabit Ethernet.

There’s four USB 2.0 ports, one USB OTG, microSD card slot, and it can run Android 5.1 and Ubuntu 16.04.

Find out more, and buy it here.

C.H.I.P.

C.H.I.P.

This board comes with built in Wi-Fi (802.11 b/g/n), Bluetooth 4.0, a 1GHz R8 processor, 512MB RAM and 4GB of storage, all for just $9.

It runs the C.H.I.P. operating system, which is based on Linux Debian.

You can pre-order it here, and shipping is estimated at some time later this month.

Banana Pi M3

Banana Pi M3

If you don’t fancy a Raspberry Pi, or an Orange Pi, and price isn’t your primary consideration, there’s always a Banana Pi. This board comes with an octa-core processor and 2GB of RAM, it includes Gigabit Ethernet, two USB 2.0 ports, one USB OTG, SATA, Wi-Fi (802.11 b/g/n), and Bluetooth 4.0, and can run Android, Lubuntu, Ubuntu, Debian, and Raspbian. It’s more expensive at $70, but you do get what you pay for. You can find out more, and discover stockists here.

There are other boards available, including the Banana Pi BPI-M64.

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Matrix Voice is a Raspberry Pi-like Board with Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa Support http://projects-raspberry.com/matrix-voice-raspberry-pi-like-board-google-assistant-amazon-alexa-support/ http://projects-raspberry.com/matrix-voice-raspberry-pi-like-board-google-assistant-amazon-alexa-support/#respond Mon, 22 Jan 2018 07:26:49 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=13551 The Raspberry Pi launched in February 2012 for $35, and it went on to become an incredible success. An entire ecosystem of Raspberry Pi-based products has sprung up around it, and now, there’s another to add to the list. Matrix Labs, a company that raised over $130,000 on Indiegogo, announced Friday that it’s begun shipping Matrix […]

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The Raspberry Pi launched in February 2012 for $35, and it went on to become an incredible success. An entire ecosystem of Raspberry Pi-based products has sprung up around it, and now, there’s another to add to the list. Matrix Labs, a company that raised over $130,000 on Indiegogo, announced Friday that it’s begun shipping Matrix Voice, a Raspberry Pi-based standalone development board that allows developers to create voice-control apps quickly and easily.

Matrix Voice is a Raspberry Pi-like Board with Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa Support

Matrix Voice measures 3.14 inches in diameter and features voice recognition integration with Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa. It has a radial array of 7 MEMS microphones that connected to a Xilinx Spartan6 FPGA + 64 Mbit SDRAM, and 64 GPIO pins for device-to-device pairing– 40 pins for Raspberry Pi, 16 GPIOs, 2i2c, and power pins. Other features include far-field voice capture, beamforming, acoustic source localization, noise suppression, de-reverberation and acoustic echo cancellation, and more.

Amazon Alexa Support

Don’t have a Raspberry Pi? No problem. There’s a standalone variant of Matrix Voice, Matrix Voice WiFi/BT/MC, that has a 2.4GHz Wi-Fi and Bluetooth-enabled 32-bit microcontroller.

The goal is to provide developers a platform with a platform for custom voice recognition and hardware-accelerated machine learning (ML) algorithms, Matrix Labs co-founder and CEO Rodolfo Saccoman said. “Matrix Voice is our latest addition to Matrix Labs toolbox and, like our Matrix Creator dev board, Matrix OS, and Matrix App Store,” he said in a press release. “[I]t’s accelerating the creation of next-generation voice-control apps faster and more cost-effectively than ever before.

Matrix Voice is part of Matrix ecosystem, which includes Matrix Creator, a Raspberry Pi-based developer board; the Matrix App Store, an IoT app marketplace; and Matrix OS, a platform for Matrix Creator apps.

“The Matrix Voice crowdfunding campaign proved an incredible demand for sophisticated, yet easy-to-install and affordable voice control functionality,” Mr. Saccoman said. “[T]he market wants to incorporate voice into their IoT projects, and now they can do so with MATRIX Voice.”

Matrix Voice and standalone Matrix Voice are available from Matrix’s website for $55 and $65, respectively, and will come to Newark element14 later this year. It’s manufactured by Premier Farnell, which made the company’s first product, the Matrix Creator, and also manufacturers Raspberry Pi boards.

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PiPlant: Check Moisture with Sensor on Windows 10 IoT http://projects-raspberry.com/piplant-check-moisture-sensor-windows-10-iot/ http://projects-raspberry.com/piplant-check-moisture-sensor-windows-10-iot/#respond Mon, 22 Jan 2018 06:06:08 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=11915 Story It all starts with installing Windows 10 IoT on a suitable device. I used a Raspberry Pi 2 (Model B) and installed the creators update of Windows 10 IoT. You should really get the dashboard from Microsoft: https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/iot/downloads. It is really easy to get Windows 10 IoT on your device. Here is a small […]

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Story

It all starts with installing Windows 10 IoT on a suitable device. I used a Raspberry Pi 2 (Model B) and installed the creators update of Windows 10 IoT. You should really get the dashboard from Microsoft: https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/iot/downloads.piplant-check-moisture with sensor on windows 10 iot

It is really easy to get Windows 10 IoT on your device. Here is a small manual: https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/iot/docs/iotdashboard.

If you have your Visual Studio 2017 configured, you can easy deploy to it.

The hardware

I bought stuff from Aliexpress. I had no rush, so I saved a lot of money.

I was inspired by this article but that referenced to a moisture sensor for 4 gbp and shipping was also 4 gbp. So just the sensor could cost me 9,40 eur. Which makes it less fun, because the whole idea of a Raspberry Pi is that you can make an Internet of Things device with little costs.

I spent only 42 cents on the sensor and bought some male/female, male/male, female/female jumper cables, too, and even an HDMI to DVI connector so I could connect an external monitor, but I never used it.circuit piplant check moisture with sensor on windows 10 iot

So I had to spend € 2,61 euro, including shipping, to get the parts for my Pi 2.

Hardware wiring

Connect the probe to the sensor with two wires. It doesn’t matter which goes where.

So I had to spend € 2,61 euro, including shipping, to get the parts for my Pi 2.

Hardware wiring

Connect the probe to the sensor with two wires. It doesn’t matter which goes where.

This is a good page for gpio pins: http://www.raspberrypi-spy.co.uk/2012/06/simple-guide-to-the-rpi-gpio-header-and-pins/.

Software

I hit a strange bug with the UWP but fixed it, thanks to stack overflow, by manually creating a project.json file. As previously stated, I was inspired by this article but that is coded in Python. My preference language is still C# and I wanted to try Win 10 IoT. So I rewrote this Python code to C# and got this:

For more detail: PiPlant: Check Moisture with Sensor on Windows 10 IoT

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Tibbo Project System-based Aircon Controller Application http://projects-raspberry.com/tibbo-project-system-based-aircon-controller-application/ http://projects-raspberry.com/tibbo-project-system-based-aircon-controller-application/#respond Mon, 22 Jan 2018 05:23:31 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=12841 The app allows you to manage traditional air conditioners that are controlled through infrared remotes. Designed for the office environment, the app relies on the ambient brightness (measured by Tibbit #28) to determine whether the aircon should be running or not. In the office setting, no lights = no people = no need for the […]

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The app allows you to manage traditional air conditioners that are controlled through infrared remotes. Designed for the office environment, the app relies on the ambient brightness (measured by Tibbit #28) to determine whether the aircon should be running or not. In the office setting, no lights = no people = no need for the aircon to work.

Tibbo Project System-based Aircon Controller Application

Air conditioning is a consumptive business while air conditioners are big-ticket to run. In general, AC systems, older ones, in particular, do not have any real temperature feedback. You set the temperature on your remote, but alas, it has absolutely nothing to do with the actual temperature in the room. Even when it gets colder outsides, many aircons keep blasting cold air into your space. As a result, you have to constantly readjust the temperature as needed for optimal comfort throughout the day. 

No doubt, AC systems are improving day by day, but there are still old systems that cannot get updated. In some instances, it’s absolutely impossible to invest in a new system. Sometimes, it is just a catch 22 to rip the old aircon out and install a new one. A basic aircon has many parts that typically are split between an outside and inside configuration, hence you may have to undergo a drastic interior renovation. In Tibbo office in Taipei, we have got trapped in an identical situation. We just have to get by with the AC system we’ve got. Our aircon is controlled with a dozen of infrared remotes lying around.

A while back, we set a challenge to create a management system for our dated HVAC system. Needless to say, we used our Tibbo Project System (TPS) for this endeavor. Our spec for the aircon controller consisted of two main items:

Read more: Tibbo Project System-based Aircon Controller Application

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Using WiFi Communication (UDP Protocol) – Example 1 http://projects-raspberry.com/using-wifi-communication-udp-protocol-example-1/ http://projects-raspberry.com/using-wifi-communication-udp-protocol-example-1/#respond Sun, 21 Jan 2018 05:54:13 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=11911 Introduction Communication plays an important role in distributed applications. It allows devices in a system to communicate with each other in order to exchange information or coordinate to perform some tasks. Depending on the communication requirements of the application such as wired/wireless, short distances/long distances, data transfer rates, security etc., suitable communication methods can be […]

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Introduction

Communication plays an important role in distributed applications. It allows devices in a system to communicate with each other in order to exchange information or coordinate to perform some tasks. Depending on the communication requirements of the application such as wired/wireless, short distances/long distances, data transfer rates, security etc., suitable communication methods can be selected. In this work, WiFi communication (UDP protocol) is chosen to demonstrate its application through the following examples. The examples are broken down into their own links for easy access.using wifi communication udp protocol example 1

EXAMPLE 1 Demonstrates application of using WiFi communication for exchanging data between DragonBoard and Raspberry Pi 3 over a WiFi network. The DragonBoard is responsible for requesting measurements from the MPU-9255 and LIDAR Lite v2 sensors and packing the measurement data into packages before sending to the Raspberry Pi 3. A Producer/ Consumer pattern using a BufferBlock concurrent collection is implemented for the sending and receiving data.

EXAMPLE 2 Demonstrates another application of using WiFi communication in transferring data between a DragonBoard (or Raspberry Pi 3) and a computer via a local WiFi network. In this example, the DragonBoard requests measurements of temperature and humidity from a SHT21 sensor. These measurements are also packed into data packages and then sent to the computer. A LabVIEW application in the computer is designed to receive these data packages and plot the temperature and humidity measurements on the monitor.

WiFi communication using UDP Protocol

WiFi communication is wireless connections that enable devices to communicate over radio signal. UDP and TCP are two primary protocols using in WiFi communication. TCP stands for Transmission Control Protocol and UDP stands for User Datagram Protocol. TCP is a connection-oriented protocol. It is suited for applications that require high reliability, and transmission time is relatively less critical. In contrast, UDP is a connectionless protocol. It is preferred for applications that need fast, efficient transmission. The selection of the protocols depends on an application. [1]

To be able to use WiFi communication, a WiFi network must be established. In addition, the devices in the network must be equipped with WiFi hardware. DragonBoard 410c and Raspberry Pi 3 already have built-in WiFi hardware so there is no need for any external WiFi adapter. A WiFi network can be formed easily by an Access Point. However, what if an Access Point is not available or the WiFi network is restricted to access? In this case, a Virtual WiFi network can be created by a software solution with a laptop integrated with a WiFi NIC card or a computer equipped with a Wireless USB Adapter.using wifi communication udp protocol

Virtual WiFi

If a Virtual WiFi network is needed, the following commands can be executed in the “Command Prompt” (Run as Administrator) to create a Microsoft Virtual Network.

 

For more detail: Using WiFi Communication (UDP Protocol) – Example 1

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LTC3126 – 42V, 2.5A Synchronous Step-Down Regulator with No-Loss Input PowerPath http://projects-raspberry.com/ltc3126-42v-2-5a-synchronous-step-regulator-no-loss-input-powerpath/ http://projects-raspberry.com/ltc3126-42v-2-5a-synchronous-step-regulator-no-loss-input-powerpath/#respond Sun, 21 Jan 2018 05:11:00 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=12835 Features Seamless, Automatic Transition Between Two Input Power Sources Wide Input Voltage Range: 2.4V to 42V Wide Output Voltage Range: 0.818V to VIN Up to 2.5A Continuous Output Current Pin Selectable Priority and Ideal Diode-OR Modes Burst Mode® Operation, IQ = 2μA 95% Efficiency at 1A, VIN = 12V, VOUT = 5V 1μA Current in Shutdown […]

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Features

  • Seamless, Automatic Transition Between Two Input Power Sources
  • Wide Input Voltage Range: 2.4V to 42V
  • Wide Output Voltage Range: 0.818V to VIN
  • Up to 2.5A Continuous Output Current
  • Pin Selectable Priority and Ideal Diode-OR Modes
  • Burst Mode® Operation, IQ = 2μA
  • 95% Efficiency at 1A, VIN = 12V, VOUT = 5V
  • 1μA Current in Shutdown
  • Programmable Input UVLO Thresholds
  • Input Valid, Priority Channel and PGOOD Indicators
  • 200kHz to 2.2MHz Fixed Frequency PWM
  • Synchronizable to an External Clock
  • Current Mode Control with 60ns Minimum On-Time
  • Minimal External Components
  • Thermally Enhanced 28-Lead 4mm × 5mm QFN and 28-Lead TSSOP Packages

LTC3126 - 42V, 2.5A Synchronous Step-Down Regulator with No-Loss Input PowerPath

Description

The LTC®3126 is a high efficiency synchronous buck converter with an internal no-loss PowerPath™ supporting seamless operation from two separate input power sources. Pin selectable ideal diode-OR and priority input modes with user programmable undervoltage lockout thresholds provide full control over the transition between the input power sources. The fast, automatic switchover provided by the internal PowerPath eliminates the need for hold-up capacitors and minimizes disturbances on the output rail. An active input channel indicator and independent input and output power good signals provide complete feedback of the power system status.

A wide 2.4V to 42V input voltage range, 2.5A output current capability and 2μA Burst Mode operation quiescent current facilitate use of the LTC3126 with a wide variety of power sources including supercapacitors, automotive batteries, unregulated wall adapters and single to multi-cell stacks of most battery chemistries. Additional features include 1μA current in shutdown, internal softstart and thermal protection. The LTC3126 is available in thermally enhanced 28-lead 4mm × 5mm QFN and 28-lead TSSOP packages.

Read more: LTC3126 – 42V, 2.5A Synchronous Step-Down Regulator with No-Loss Input PowerPath

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Smart Parking System http://projects-raspberry.com/smart-parking-system/ http://projects-raspberry.com/smart-parking-system/#respond Sat, 20 Jan 2018 10:09:41 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=11907 Hardware components: Raspberry Pi 3 Model B × 1 Arduino Mega 2560 & Genuino Mega 2560 × 1 HC-SR04 × 3 Software apps and online services: Samsung IoT ARTIK Cloud for IoT Google Maps Arduino IDE   STORY Finding a free parking lot in a congested city like Bangalore is very hard. Here, if anyone […]

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Hardware components: Pi 3 02
Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
× 1 Ardgen mega
Arduino Mega 2560 & Genuino Mega 2560
× 1 51gzz5eu9pl. sx425
HC-SR04
× 3 Software apps and online services: Artik logo cloud
Samsung IoT ARTIK Cloud for IoT
New google maps logo
Google Maps
Ide web
Arduino IDE

 

Smart Parking System

STORY

Finding a free parking lot in a congested city like Bangalore is very hard. Here, if anyone wants to go outside from home with personal car first thing comes in his mind is about parking, where he will park his car. Most of the cases, people go to a parking station and find that all parking slot are full and then he have to search for another parking lot. So, it is a big hassle and many people keep in fear about parking of his car when he gets out with his car.

So, I was thinking, how the problem can be solved and finally I succeeded to make a cloud based smart parking system and I hope implementing the system can remove the parking problem of my city. ARTIK Cloud is really a nice and appropriate platform for such job.

Using this system a user will be will able to find an available parking lot easily using mobile or web app from anywhere. The system updates parking data every 30 seconds.

In this project I will show you how you can easily build such smart system. Definitely, I will use ARTIK Cloud platform, the coolest IoT cloud platform. Before going to the details, enjoy the demo video of my demo project.

For this demo system you have to create only one new devices in Samsung Artik Cloud platform. I will show it here. I named my devices as rainbow-parking, and store parking data such as free slots in a parking lot. Raspi sends parking information according to the preset rules.

Steps involved in this project:

1. Making one device in Artik Cloud Platform

2. Making one application in Artik Cloud

3. Making one rule in Artik Cloud

4. Preparing Arduino

5. Connecting the Sensors

6. Preparing Raspberry Pi

7. Developing Web Application

So, Let’s start one by one. First thing first. Let’s start with making a new device in Artik cloud platform.

Step 1: Making a new device in Artik Cloud Platform

A) Log in to your Samsung account and Click on DEVELOPER option from top right corner.

B) From the DASHBOARD select DEVICE TYPES and Click on NEW

C) On the DEVICE DISPLAY NAME type a name for the device and give a UNIQUE NAME, then click to CREATE DEVICE TYPE.

D) Click on + NEW MANIFEST

E) Type a FIELD NAME for your sensor data you will upload and store here and mention the DATA TYPE as integer. Then click to SAVE

Block Diagram of Smart Parking System

Block Diagram of Smart Parking System

F) Then click NEXT: DEVICE ACTIONS

G) Make an action or select from the STANDARD ACTIONS. Click to SAVE. For our project actions will not be required. Then click to NEXT:ACTIVE MANIFEST.

Read More: Smart Parking System

 

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Lithium-ion battery fires: 7 solutions for improved safety http://projects-raspberry.com/lithium-ion-battery-fires-7-solutions-improved-safety/ http://projects-raspberry.com/lithium-ion-battery-fires-7-solutions-improved-safety/#respond Sat, 20 Jan 2018 04:56:22 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=12832 I would feel so much safer on my next flight from Phoenix to Silicon Valley if I knew that there were safeguards in place inside passengers’ smartphones that could prevent fire and explosion from such design decisions like a company packing 10 pounds of Lithium-ion battery into a 5 pound compartment or a smartphone owner […]

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I would feel so much safer on my next flight from Phoenix to Silicon Valley if I knew that there were safeguards in place inside passengers’ smartphones that could prevent fire and explosion from such design decisions like a company packing 10 pounds of Lithium-ion battery into a 5 pound compartment or a smartphone owner buying a lower cost, after-market battery replacing the original battery in their phone from some country and supplier of which I had never heard.

Lithium-ion battery fires 7 solutions for improved safety

This article will serve as a technical and thought-provoking effort to stir some ideas that will render the Lithium-ion battery safe under any conditions of manufacturing defect or mechanical damage to the battery; hopefully in an expedient manner before catastrophe strikes.

The problem is not just smartphone batteries, but laptops and other battery-operated electronics with Lithium-ion batteries. However, since the Samsung case is so recent and widespread, I wanted to focus mostly upon the smartphone in this article.

Typically, Lithium-ion batteries are safe and reliable. Just think about the $28B market they had in 2013 with a relatively small amount of fires and explosions. But every fire and explosion incident has the potential to cause a loss of life or serious personal injury (Not to mention the collateral material damage and cost). For those of us who fly often, an immediate solution would be nice. The Federal Aviation Administration’s strong warning against using the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 aboard planes is necessary but not sufficient.

Let’s look at seven possible solutions based on solid technical research, which will build upon my recent initial article touching on this subject.

  1. Using liquid coolant
  2. Fire-retardant thermal insulation
  3. Improved cathode materials
  4. Smart multi-functional fluids
  5. Strengthening the mechanical battery enclosure
  6. Better modeling
  7. Lower electrolyte flammability

Read more: Lithium-ion battery fires: 7 solutions for improved safety

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Communicating with OBD-2 (On-Board Diagnostics) Systems http://projects-raspberry.com/communicating-obd-2-board-diagnostics-systems/ http://projects-raspberry.com/communicating-obd-2-board-diagnostics-systems/#respond Fri, 19 Jan 2018 09:57:13 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=11903 Hardware components: ELM327 OBD2/OBDII USB Car Diagnostic Interface × 1 Qualcomm DragonBoard 410c × 1 Raspberry Pi 3 Model B × 1 Software apps and online services: Microsoft Windows 10 IoT Core   STORY Introduction OBD (On-Board Diagnostics) is a computer-based system designed primarily to monitor the performance of vehicle engines and to control vehicle […]

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Hardware components:
ELM327 OBD2/OBDII USB Car Diagnostic Interface
× 1 Db410c blue 2a
Qualcomm DragonBoard 410c
× 1 Pi 3 02
Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
× 1 Software apps and online services: 10
Microsoft Windows 10 IoT Core

 

Communicating with OBD-2 (On-Board Diagnostics) Systems

STORY

Introduction

OBD (On-Board Diagnostics) is a computer-based system designed primarily to monitor the performance of vehicle engines and to control vehicle emissions. The OBD systems have been mandatory for all cars and light trucks built in the US back in 1996. The second-generation system, OBD2, sets some communication standards that allow external devices to communicate with the controller modules of the vehicle through the DLC port. Real-time performance parameters of the vehicle such as Engine RPM, Vehicle Speed, Air Flow Rate, etc. can be extracted easily. The OBD2 system also updates the vehicle operating conditions through the diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs).

In this work, a device integrated a ELM327L protocol interpreter processor is introduced to perform the communication with OBD2 system. To demonstrate the communication with OBD2 systems, a DragonBoard (or Raspberry Pi) is used to communicate with the ELM327 and request data from the OBD2 system. Some essential AT commands are also introduced to customize the behaviors of the ELM327L. In addition, examples of acquiring vehicle operating information such as Vehicle speed and Engine RPM are demonstrated. Based on these examples, it is possible to develop portable applications to diagnose personal vehicles using the DTC codes.

Connect to OBD2 Systems

Although OBD systems can be accessed easily through a standard DLC port, the communication hardware interfaces behind the DLC port depend on the automakers. In particular, there are at least 5 communication protocols correspond to each communication hardware interfaces The DLC port consists of 16 pins which some specific pins are reserved for dedicated communication interfaces.

ELM327L – OBD to RS-232 Interpreter

It is possible to design the communication interface hardware for a specific protocol that the automaker provides. However, ELM327L processor is an all-in-one solution that can interface with almost available protocols. In fact, ELM327L is an OBD to RS-232 interpreter chip in which it converts the protocols supported by the OBD2 system to the RS232 protocol and vice versa.

Block diagram of Communicating with OBD-2 (On-Board Diagnostics) Systems

Block diagram of Communicating with OBD-2 (On-Board Diagnostics) Systems

ELM327 USB Car Diagnostic Tool

This work uses a device called ELM327 USB Car Diagnostic Tool to access to the OBD system. This tool also integrates a FTDI 232 UART-USB chip to allow a connection to a USB interface. In addition, the tool packs all necessary electronic components such as the connectors of the DLC port and USB port into a compact plastic shell. There are several tools that integrate the ELM327L processor with interfaces such as Bluetooth or WiFi on the market. However, serial communication with the RS-232 protocol is opted for simplicity and ease of use.

Communicating with the ELM327L

There are two type of commands that the DragonBoard/Raspberry Pi can direct the ELM327L. Commands are intended for the ELM327L’s internal configuration will begin with the characters AT, while OBD commands for the vehicle are only allowed to contain the ASCII codes for hexadecimal digits (0 to 9 and A to F). Whether it is an AT type internal command or a hex string for the OBD bus, all messages to the ELM327L must be terminated will a carriage return character (hex ‘0D’) before it will be acted upon. [1]

The ELM327L is not case-sensitive; therefore, the commands such as ATZ, atz, and AtZ are all the same when the DragonBoard/Raspberry Pi sends to the ELM327L. The ELM327L also ignores space characters and all control characters (tab, etc.). For example, the commands ATS 0 and ATS0 to remove the spaces in the OBD response message are also the same. The DragonBoard/Raspberry Pi can take advantage of this to save the sending characters and improve the communication speed.

Setting ELM327L Serial Baud Rate

The default baud rate of the ELM327L is 38400 kbps. Technically, the baud rate of the ELM327L is advisable to operate at a maximum speed of 115000 kbps. However, the USB Car Diagnostic Tool comes with an integrated USB to RS-232 interface using a popular FTDI-232 chip. Thus, the higher baud rate of 500000 bps (500 kbps) can be achieved easily. The following commands are used to permanently set the communication speed for serial communication of ELM327L to 250000 bps (250 kbps). The commands can be executed in programs such as the HyperTerminal or the Serial Monitor tool in the Arduino IDE. The SerialUART sample from Microsoft can serve as a Serial Communication Terminal too.

Setting baud rate (250 kbps) commands: (please refer to the ELM327L datasheet for configure with different baud rates)

AT PP 0C SV 10

AT PP 0C ON

OBD message structure

The OBD2 standards require that each OBD command or request that is sent to the system must adhere to a set format. The first byte sent (known as the MODE) describes the type of data being requested, while the second byte (and possibly a third or more) specifies the actual information that is required. The bytes which follow after the mode byte are known as the parameter identification or PID. [1]

Read More: Communicating with OBD-2 (On-Board Diagnostics) Systems

 

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NUT4NT, Open-Source 4-Channel GNSS Receiver Development Board http://projects-raspberry.com/nut4nt-open-source-4-channel-gnss-receiver-development-board/ http://projects-raspberry.com/nut4nt-open-source-4-channel-gnss-receiver-development-board/#respond Fri, 19 Jan 2018 04:46:45 +0000 http://projects-raspberry.com/?p=12829 Although the industry of professional satellite navigation systems is limited to experts and large companies, Amungo Navigation is working towards bringing this industry to individual developers, small companies, and startups through its new open source platform “NUT4NT”. NUT4NT is a development board which implements NT1065 chip with USB 3.0 interface. NT1065 is a Global Navigation […]

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Although the industry of professional satellite navigation systems is limited to experts and large companies, Amungo Navigation is working towards bringing this industry to individual developers, small companies, and startups through its new open source platform NUT4NT.

NUT4NT, Open-Source 4-Channel GNSS Receiver Development Board

NUT4NT is a development board which implements NT1065 chip with USB 3.0 interface. NT1065 is a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiver designed by NTLab, a fabless microelectronic company. It is the first low-cost low-power RF front-end solution in the world. It also has 4 channels supporting all GNSS systems and bands.

GNSS receivers are electronic devices that receive and process signals from a GNSS satellite. These signals used to provide information about receiver’s position,velocity, and time.

NUT4NT has two different working modes. The first uses dual inputs and acts as a centimeter level precision positioning tool, without the need of high quality antenna. The other mode uses the four inputs and provides an array antenna processing system to simply reduce interference and noise.

Hardware and software specifications of NUT4NT:

  • Receiver chip: NT1065
  • USB 3.0 controller: CYUSB3014
  • Clock rate: 10 MHz
  • RF inputs: two or four, depending on board option
  • RF inputs referred Noise Floor: 1 dB
  • ADC resolution – two-bit
  • ADC frequency – up to 99 MHz
  • Samples transfer – continuous full stream, from 20 to 100 Mbytes/sec
  • Power: 5V @ 0.5 A from USB or external adapter
  • Size: 70x50x20 mm (early board) / 77x122x25 mm (single board)
  • All GNSS systems: GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, BeiDou, IRNSS and future
  • All GNSS band: L1/L2/L3/L5, G1/G2/G5, B1/B2, E1/E5 and future
  • Four-channel synchronous reception for antenna array processing
  • Signal dumper (grabber) software
  • Spectrum analyzer software
  • NT1065 configuration software
  • Supports libusb API
  • Supports native Cypress driver API
  • Software for Windows, Linux, and potentially all other OS’s with libusb

There are two options of NUT4NT boards, the Early Board and the Single Board.

Read more: NUT4NT, Open-Source 4-Channel GNSS Receiver Development Board

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